Taking the Piercing Plunge

A Dear Abby letter in the paper this morning caught my attention. Two daughters are embarrassed because their 44-year-old mother had her nipples pierced and delights in showing off her embellished breasts to their friends.

The day before, I’d taken the extra piercing plunge, adding another hole above the lower-lobe site of my original piercing years ago. I chose to add only one piercing, to flaunt a tiny hoop. I can’t really explain why I wanted this done; but it’s a big “0” birthday year and perhaps that makes it significant.

I had to wait until I was 13 to get my ears pierced. A friend of my Aunt Anne’s had done my mother’s on a visit to Tucson, Arizona and my mother, quite comfortable in a science laboratory, felt confident she could pierce mine.   One evening, after the supper table had been cleared, she announced she’d do my ears. She lit a match to sterilize a needle, made two nearly even dots on each ear with a pen, iced my ears, and poked through, first one then the other. I must have had a pair of gold studs that she put in. I never had an infection, and have worn earrings ever since.

Years later, my daughter got her ears pierced at a jeweler, turning down my mother’s offer to do her ears.

My sister Madeline has had an extra earring hole for several years and recently went for what’s called a “daith”—an ear piercing that passes through the ear’s innermost cartilage fold. She got it because she’d read this form of piercing, acting similarly to acupuncture, could relieve the symptoms of migraine headaches, which she suffers from periodically. She’s finding that the triggers and symptoms are definitely less severe. images

Walking with my daughter in NYC’s East Village yesterday, I’d mentioned I was interested in an ear piercing.   As we strolled, we saw what appeared to be a rather upscale piercing place—really a fancy jewelry store that offered piercings.

The saleswoman showed me photographs on an iPad to help me select what I wanted and then I completed the necessary paperwork and signed away liability. Times have changed since my mother poked my ears in the kitchen.

The piercing technician made sure I’d read the cleaning procedures, verified that the tools were sterile and wore rubber gloves. In seconds the act was completed, and I walked out with a tiny rose gold hoop that has to remain in place for about 6 months. IMG_7362

The ear is a bit sore and I have to watch when I take clothes over my head. The earring is small and hardly noticeable. I’m not sure it adds anything to my overall looks, and not so sure I’m any “cooler” with it. I may or may not keep it; or maybe I’ll get another one day– but I promise I’ll stick to my ears only.

 

 

 

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About cyclingrandma

I was a journalist (Danbury News-Times, Ct), before becoming a teacher, and continue to write for professional journals. I have written several study guides for Penguin Books and write for Education Update, a newspaper based in New York City. (www.educationupdate.com). I’ve interviewed many authors, college presidents, and scientists. I wrote “The Kentucky Derby’s Forgotten Jockeys” for Smithsonian Magazine's website, www.smithsonian.com. (April, 2009). Two essays have been published in book anthologies; one for Wisdom of Our Mothers, (Familia Books) and the other in “College Search and Parent Rescue: Essay for Parents by Parents of College-Going Students.” (St. Martin’s Press). I was a middle school Language Arts teacher for more than 10 years and have just completed a five year grant position under No Child Left Behind in Newark, NJ public schools. I have three children, two daughters-in law, and six grandchildren. I'm an avid cyclist, knitter, cook, and reader. I love theater, museums, and yoga.
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14 Responses to Taking the Piercing Plunge

  1. jfrances40 says:

    Good for you!! A fun thing to do ……in our middle years!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. getting hip, mom! why promise anything about the future? Desperate times call for desperate measures.

    Like

  3. madtaylor says:

    Face it, we’re a couple of bad-asses!!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I like it Lisa! I got my ears pierced when I was 16. These days there are usually 2 people and they do both ears at the same time. My mom wanted me to get my ears pierced for years. I was always too afraid. Finally I agreed, at 16. The technician pierced the first ear and I stood up to leave (I don’t like pain) My mom pushed me back in the seat with the heel of her hand on my forehead and the technician pierced the other ear! haha

    As for nipple piercing. I knew a woman who pierced her own nipples using an ice cube to freeze them and then a needle – EEK! ❤
    Diana xo

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Letty Sue Albert says:

    Not convinced about the piercing, but I do love your new look, based on your updated photo…shorter, darker hair, makeup, whatever…..Looking great! XxLS

    Liked by 1 person

  6. The photographer does all that! Thanks!

    Like

  7. Have Fun! Doesn’t look bad. Good for that lone earig that lost it’s mate!

    Like

  8. Those poor girls! Not so much because of their mother’s piercings, but because she clearly has no boundaries as regards flashing her breasts at people… Your family adventures sound more sedate, but more about having fun, too.

    Like

  9. Piercing your nipples is fine, if that’s what you want… but showing your kids? Totally inappropriate, I think. I have 4 piercings on one side and 2 on the other. I have wanted to get a daith, but my one cartilage piercing hurt so much, I’m a chicken! Love your new earring, Lisa!

    Like

  10. lisakunk says:

    Migraine relief, huh? I might start suggesting that to my numerous migraine sufferers. When you’ve tried everything, what’s left to lose. You have my permission to pierce away. Have fun.

    Liked by 1 person

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