Celebrating March

Feeling like there haven’t been any holidays to celebrate? Waiting around until you don Kelly green shamrocks, cook corn beef and back soda bread? Don’t fret. Here a few March celebrations that can be ongoing.

Dr. Suess’ Birthday, March 2

“It’s not slumpasana, “ my yoga teacher instructed, demonstrating a forward bend meant to keep her back straight. I laughed, quietly, after all, this was yoga class and thought of how children make up words and pronunciations as they learn to talk. My grandson Simon, now 26 months, says “pinamas” for pajamas, and his “I love you” sounds like a Hawaiian greeting.

When the kids were in school and first learning to read and write, they were encouraged to invent spellings of words.  They’d write entire stories with words only they could read.

Dr. Suess‘ 108th birthday was honored with Read Across America Day celebrations nationwide. We’re now reading The Lorax, to Simon, who loves hearing and repeating “Truffula trees,” “cruffulous croak” and “smogulous smoke. ”  

Happy Birthday, Dr. Suess, may you continue to inspire readers and writers infinitely.

National Grammar Day March 4

 Read as “March Forth” we’re encouraged to conquer grammar demons and write fearlessly. I learned grammar best when teaching it to middle schoolers. There are tons of books available to help hone skills. My favorite is the simplest: Strunk & White’s Elements of Style.

Happy Birthday, Oreos!

 Lastly, tomorrow the Oreo turns 100 years old.  Created and sold in 1912 by the National Biscuit Company, the cookie, now produced by Kraft Foods, has more than 35 varieties, including a birthday version.

My family were Hydrox fans. I found them less sweet and crispier when dunked in milk, the only way to eat them. Sadly, I was in a minority.  Kellogg Co. stopped producing the cookie, which had been rechristened Droxies, unable to compete against the more popular Oreos.

March is also National Women’s History Month and there’s no better time to keep women’s rights in mind.

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About cyclingrandma

I was a journalist (Danbury News-Times, Ct), before becoming a teacher, and continue to write for professional journals. I have written several study guides for Penguin Books and write for Education Update, a newspaper based in New York City. (www.educationupdate.com). I’ve interviewed many authors, college presidents, and scientists. I wrote “The Kentucky Derby’s Forgotten Jockeys” for Smithsonian Magazine's website, www.smithsonian.com. (April, 2009). Two essays have been published in book anthologies; one for Wisdom of Our Mothers, (Familia Books) and the other in “College Search and Parent Rescue: Essay for Parents by Parents of College-Going Students.” (St. Martin’s Press). I was a middle school Language Arts teacher for more than 10 years and have just completed a five year grant position under No Child Left Behind in Newark, NJ public schools. I have three children, two daughters-in law, and six grandchildren. I'm an avid cyclist, knitter, cook, and reader. I love theater, museums, and yoga.
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9 Responses to Celebrating March

  1. SMB says:

    “Slumpasana” is wonderful!

    This reminds me of Malachy McCourt’s book “A Monk Swimming”. As a boy, McCourt thought that the “Hail Mary” said “Blessed art thou a monk swimming” instead of Blessed art thou amongst women”. As a boy, my uncle used to think that the “Our Father” said “Our Father was shot in heaven/ Harold be His name” instead of “Our Father, who art in heaven/ Hallowed be His name”.

    When I was a child I thought the words of the Easter hymn were “Angels in white raincoats/rolled the stone away” instead of “Angels in white raiment/rolled the stone away”.

    My favourite Dr Seuss book is “Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?” As a child, it helped me through the death of my father, and is still an excellent mantra for the hard times. “Just tell yourself, Duckie, you’re really quite lucky/ Some critters are much more/ Oh muchly much much more worse off than you”

    Today (March 5) we can celebrate the Chinese festival of 驚蟄 “waking up the insects”, after their winter hibernation.

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  2. Knitn' Green says:

    We also celebrate the Fifth of March because, last name March, quantity of March’s = 5!

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  3. Thanks for such a timely post. I was watching some of the interviews for the Lorax movie. I could only laugh at the number of times I laughed as John and I read those books. We have them all in the basement. He plans on taking them when he leaves. I have all of them. I found that reading was the best thing for an only son. ” Green Eggs and Ham,” and ” Horton Hears a Who” were favorites and a quick read for a tired Mom after getting home late from the office.
    I ate way too many Oreo cookies as a kid. My mom did the Hydrox also. We liked those. There was a cheaper store version for a while that was also good and my Mom would by those.
    Well, we should all celebrate National Grammar Day. Here’s to bring back better formed sentences.
    Woman’s History Month came in with a bang. We have so much work to do. Here’s to a month of signing petitions and being heard.
    Happy March.

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  4. madeline taylor says:

    uh – you are forgetting the MOST important of National Holidays – my birthday March 22, nearly vested but not quite – by my husband’s March 20th He reminded me today that there are only 15 shopping days left until his birthday) Why, as a matter of fact, we ARE both ten-year-olds!
    As I understood it, growing up mom bought hydrox because back than Oreos were made with lard and that did not appeal to her kosher side of things. I think in this month are a variety of random National Such-and-Such days – national Peanut butter Day, National Anti-Oxident day (bring on the dark chocolate and red wine, right? – not sure when the days are exactly – I’ll just have all three of those things each day of the month to make sure I do not missout!

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  5. Stella Sormani says:

    Persian New Year (No Ruz) is the first day of Spring!

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  6. Leah says:

    It’s neat to see so much activity around Dr. Suess’ birthday. Tomorrow Sophie and I are going to this great independent bookstore for a children’s Dr. Suess celebration. Should be fun!

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