Cycling Sicily: Sheep, Seafood, & Salt Marshes

Our four –day cycling  trip through Sicily’s northwestern corner began in the village of Scopello,  a tiny farming hamlet complete with olive groves, prickly pear trees, and a stone public water fountain where residents bring empty bottles to fill for drinking. Descending the mountain, we toured Castellamara, a touristy seaside town, then traveled inland, through orchards and past farms and ancient ruins. We stayed two nights outside  Trapani, a port city at the foot Mt. Erice, a 751m/2,465 foot mountain, (and a  6-mile climb!), home of an enclosed medieval town, and then south to Marsala, home of salt marshes, windmills, and the sweet wine made famous by British entrepreneurs in the early 1800’s.

Fresh seafood, fantastic pasta and wines, friendly people!

Two bikes in boxes. Constructed, ready to go.  Self-guided tour organized by Pedal & Sea Adventures. Photos taken with either my Casio Exilim or Matt’s Nikon Coolpix. Good cameras for slipping in and out of bike jersey pockets!

Advertisements

About cyclingrandma

I was a journalist (Danbury News-Times, Ct), before becoming a teacher, and continue to write for professional journals. I have written several study guides for Penguin Books and write for Education Update, a newspaper based in New York City. (www.educationupdate.com). I’ve interviewed many authors, college presidents, and scientists. I wrote “The Kentucky Derby’s Forgotten Jockeys” for Smithsonian Magazine's website, www.smithsonian.com. (April, 2009). Two essays have been published in book anthologies; one for Wisdom of Our Mothers, (Familia Books) and the other in “College Search and Parent Rescue: Essay for Parents by Parents of College-Going Students.” (St. Martin’s Press). I was a middle school Language Arts teacher for more than 10 years and have just completed a five year grant position under No Child Left Behind in Newark, NJ public schools. I have three children, two daughters-in law, and six grandchildren. I'm an avid cyclist, knitter, cook, and reader. I love theater, museums, and yoga.
This entry was posted in bike riding, Cycling, exercise, food, travel and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to Cycling Sicily: Sheep, Seafood, & Salt Marshes

  1. Nathan says:

    Ah, looks so fun and beautiful. Glad you had a good time and arrived home safe!

    Like

  2. Nancy Janow says:

    Almost as good as being there myself. Lovely, Lisa. thanks for sharing.

    Like

  3. Leah says:

    Great photos and it all looks beautiful — from the scenery to the food. What a fantastic trip!

    Like

  4. Absolutely beautiful. I am envious that you can actually bike that much. I plan to get into better shape. The pictures are breathtaking.

    Like

  5. bronxboy55 says:

    Erice is incredible, isn’t it? What a great trip you must have had. When are you going back? We’ll meet you there!

    Like

    • Erice- great climb. Fogged in so we didn’t get the view. We took the cablecar down; it had gotten too cold for a long downhill ride. Not sure when/where next bike trip will be– Norway? Turkey? 2012 hopefully.

      Like

  6. Pingback: From The “Cycling Grandma” Cycling Sicily: Sheep, Seafood, & Salt Marshes « cycling123

  7. jakesprinter says:

    Really good place for cycling very nice post

    Like

  8. writecrites says:

    Looks like a wonderful trip. So different than the hop-off-the-cruise-ship-and-see-Taomina visit that I had. The world is full of such intriguing places.

    Like

    • It was great; but now that we’re in France– we think France is better. Sicily had lots of trash and wild dogs– not so great if cycling.
      But fun to see different corners of the world.

      Like

      • writecrites says:

        France is fabulous, although seeing it your way would be a completely different experience (one I would enjoy). Your mention of wild dogs brought back memories of the Micronesian island of Kosrae where, while riding a moped, I was chased by a pack of angry dogs. A bit scary at the time, but that’s all part of the adventure (next time I’ll remember to bring a big stick, as, I was told, that was the solution. Much as I would hate to hit dogs, if it comes to me or them…..

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s