More Winter Reading: An Accident, A Tsar’s Daughter & Malaria

Winter is  dragging on a bit longer than everyone likes in the North East. I’ve managed to read three books quite quickly.

Fiction from the Library’s New Book Shelf:

Mercy Snow by Tiffany Baker.   A tragic school bus accident starts the action that divulges how two families in this fictitious New Hampshire mill town intersect. Fast and compelling. 41Bqwop5mEL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_

More family intrigue emerges in Jennifer Laam’s debut novel, The Secret Daughter of the Tsar, which jumps between 1902, to 1941, to present day seamlessly.  Was there another daughter?  Suspenseful with a surprise ending. 17286831

Non-fiction

I heard David Stuart MacLean interviewed about his experiences with amnesia on the radio and asked my library to get the book. The Answer to the Riddle is Me chronicles MacLean’s reaction to the anti-malaria drug Lariam which he began taking before leaving for a Fulbright in India.  He’s found wandering at a train station, without his passport and unable to remember anything. How he pieces his life back together makes for a remarkable albeit cautionary tale.  He includes a history of malaria and its treatments—enough to make one very leery of these powerful drugs.  51z3zsl+pwL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_

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About cyclingrandma

I was a journalist (Danbury News-Times, Ct), before becoming a teacher, and continue to write for professional journals. I have written several study guides for Penguin Books and write for Education Update, a newspaper based in New York City. (www.educationupdate.com). I’ve interviewed many authors, college presidents, and scientists. I wrote “The Kentucky Derby’s Forgotten Jockeys” for Smithsonian Magazine's website, www.smithsonian.com. (April, 2009). Two essays have been published in book anthologies; one for Wisdom of Our Mothers, (Familia Books) and the other in “College Search and Parent Rescue: Essay for Parents by Parents of College-Going Students.” (St. Martin’s Press). I was a middle school Language Arts teacher for more than 10 years and have just completed a five year grant position under No Child Left Behind in Newark, NJ public schools. I have three children, two daughters-in law, two grandsons, and one grandchild due in August, 2011. I’m an avid cyclist, knitter, cook, and reader. I love theater, museums, and yoga.
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8 Responses to More Winter Reading: An Accident, A Tsar’s Daughter & Malaria

  1. Very cold here too. Was -40 with the wind chill. I force myself to go out and walk because I feel trapped when I stay in doors. The trick is dressing in layers! Right now I’m reading God for Us edited by Greg Pennoyer and is a work of multiple authors, I’m thoroughly enjoying it. It came in the mail the other day. A friend had ordered it for me (it was a surprise and it took some detective work to figure out who gifted me with it)
    Diana

  2. Drjcwash says:

    Thanks. More good books to read.

  3. susanissima says:

    Thanks for the recommendations, cyclingrandma! We had another snow here in the Pacific Northwest this past weekend and I hunkered down with One Hundred Years of Solitude for the zillionth time. Nothing warms my toes as much as Gabriel García Márquez’ sweltering jungle village of Macondo. But now the snow’s melting and some new lit adventures would be great.

  4. Colline says:

    The best activity to do when it is cold :)

  5. Interesting suggestions! The one about amnesia sounds almost frightening. It sounds like a terrible trade-off: malaria (which recurs forever) or amnesia, where your past is lost.

  6. Erika Diffley says:

    I’m always looking for new, interesting books to read. Thanks for these suggestions!

  7. Gwen Tuinman says:

    I am intrigued by the novel centred on malaria. A lot of Irish immigrants who dug out the Rideau Canal in Ottawa (Ontario/Canada) died of malaria. I always connected malaria to more tropical areas so this came as a great surprise to me. It would be interesting to learn and be entertained by a good story at the same time.

  8. It’s not a novel. A true, scary story.

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